Mandatory Online Tutorial

Mandatory Online Tutorial


UNDERGRADUATES

As a new undergraduate student at Sac State you are required to take two online tutorials: Alcohol, Zombies, and You (alcohol abuse prevention) and Not Anymore (sexual violence prevention).  The online programs are available for your participation right now.  Students are charged a one-time fee of $10.00, which is part of the regular tuition fee process, to cover the cost of the tutorials.  Completion and a post test of 75% or higher by the deadline date* is required to avoid a hold on your account which will delay your ability to register for the upcoming semester classes.  * Refer to your Student Health letter for the current semester deadline date.

Required Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program

  1. Log on to:  https://studentssuccess.org/SSO/csuszom
  2. Print out the completion certificate and keep for your records.

Required Sexual Violence Prevention Program

  1. Log on to: https://studentsuccess.org/SSO/csusna
  2. Same as above
GRADUATE & POST-BACCALAUREATE CREDENTIAL STUDENTS

As a new graduate student at Sac State you are required to take the Not Anymore sexual violence prevention tutorial. This online program is available for your participation right now.  Graduate students are charged a one-time fee of $5.00, which is part of the regular tuition fee process, to cover the cost of the tutorials.  Completion and a post test of 75% or higher by the deadline date* is required to avoid a hold on your account which will delay your ability to register for the upcoming semester classes.  * Refer to your Student Health letter for the current semester deadline date.

Required Training

  1. Log on to: https://studentssuccess.org/SSO/csusnagrad
  2. Print out the completion certificate and keep for your records

Tips to successful completion

  1. Make sure you complete all tutorials required for your level (undergraduate or graduate).
  2. Make sure you complete the evaluation section at the end of each tutorial.  Failure to do so will result in an “incomplete” by the system.
  3. Be sure to check your Sac State Student Center at least a month before you register to make sure you have no holds on your account.

If you have any questions about the program, you may contact Jessica Heskin at heskin@csus.edu. You may also e-mail Student Success through its program HELP button, or by sending an email directly to terrylynn.pearlman@studentsuccess.org

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Out of the Darkness Walk

Out of the Darkness Walk


 

 

Suicide Prevention.

Student Health and Counseling Services (SHCS) is partnering with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention for the 4th annual Out of the Darkness Suicide Awareness Walk. The walk will take place on Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 5:30pm on the South Green in front of The WELL. Student testimonials will kick off the event. Prior to the walk, a Mental Health Fair will be held from 2:30-5:30pm in front of The WELL. Directly following the event will be a candle light vigil and poetry reading. We welcome any and all who are interested in participating. This event will have amplified sound. If sound disrupts your class or activity, please contact the event coordinator Katie Hodgson at hodgsonk@csus.edu. Below is a link to event details and registration.

 

http://afsp.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.event&eventID=3101

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Alcohol Poisoning

Alcohol Poisoning


Over 1,700 college students die each year as a result of alcohol related causes, including alcohol poisoning.  Knowing the following information can help you identify the signs and symptoms of a potentially dangerous situation.

Signs & Symptoms

  • Person is unconscious or semiconscious
  • Person cannot be woken up when shaken, prodded, or otherwise prompted
  • Cold, clammy, pale, or bluish skin
  • Ten seconds or more between breaths
  • Vomiting while passed out

What To Do

  • Call 911 immediately if a person is suffering from any of the above symptoms.
  • Turn the person on his or her side.
  • Focus on your friend’s health, not on keeping them out of trouble.
  • Never leave them alone to sleep it off!
  • Different factors may contribute to a person’s excessive consumption of alcohol.  If you are confronted with this situation what is important is not why a person has had too much to drink, but what to do about it.  The following are some suggestions to approaching this situation with a focus on safety and awareness.

How to Deal with the Intoxicated Person

  • Demonstrate concern for the person’s welfare.
  • Speak in a clear & calm voice in order to reassure them.
  • Find out what the person was drinking, how much they drank and how long they have been drinking.
  • Ask about any other drugs or medicines they may have taken. 
  • Explain what you intend to do.
  • Arrange for someone to stay with the person who is vomiting.
  • Call for help if the person becomes uncontrollable or you sense an impending medical emergency.
  • As needed, encourage the intoxicated person to lie down and sleep.  Make sure they’re lying on their side to avoid choking should they start to vomit.
  • Check every 30 minutes for response and breathing for the first 2 hours and every hour thereafter.

What NOT to Do

  • Leave the person alone or assume that they will “sleep it off”.
  • Give the person a shower.
  • Give the person food or anything to drink (especially stimulants such as tea or coffee) to sober them up.
  • Induce vomiting.
  • Keep the person awake.
  • Never let an intoxicated person drive a motor vehicle or bike.
  • Write on them.
  • Walk them around.
     

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Love Your Body Week

Love Your Body Week


 

Monday, 2/23

Mirrorless Monday

All day

Union, The WELL, Lassen Hall, Residence halls

 

Tuesday, 2/24

Presentation: Making Peace With Your Body

10:30-11:30am

Meadow/Vineyard Suite, The WELL

Dr. Tony Paulson

 

Beautiful Body of Food, Cooking Demonstration

1-2pm

The Cove in the WELL

Nutrition PHE’s

 

Wednesday, 2/25

Yoga and Mindfulness workshop

1-2:30pm

Eating Recovery Center of California

Terrace Suite, The WELL

 

Thursday, 2/26

Presentation: Where’s My Orgasm?

10am-11:30

Lobby Suite, Union

Dr. Patty Woodward

 

Presentation: Reflections of Beauty, body image and the media

3-4pm

Forest Suite, University Union

Kalyn Coppedge

 

Friday, 2/27

Take the Love Your Body Pledge!

10-1

Library Quad

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Wanna Quit?

Wanna Quit?


80% of Sacramento State students are tobacco-free

(Sacramento State Core Survey, Spring 2006)
And research shows that most students who use tobacco want to quit.

Getting Ready to Quit

If you are one of the students who wants to quit, you have come to the right place! Student Health Services provides Sacramento State students free one-on-one cessation counseling with a Health Educator. To schedule an appointment with our Health Educator call 916.278.6026. Additionally this page will provide you with some things to help you get started with your new tobacco free life.

Know why you use tobacco:

A 2005 survey of college students showed these to be their top 5 reasons for smoking:

  1. When drinking
  2. To relieve stress / to relax
  3. It’s pleasurable
  4. To take a break
  5. To socialize

Colorado Collegiate Tobacco Prevention Initiative 2004-05

To find out what kind of tobacco user you are take the quiz at healthylifestyle.upmc.com

  • Also, spend some time looking at your personal habit. Keep a diary where you record:
  • Each time you smoke/chew (8:00, 12:30, midnight)
  • Your mood when you light up (happy, sad, angry, bored, etc.)
  • How bad the craving is (scale of 1-3)
  • Who you are with (friends, alone, boyfriend/girlfriend)
  • What you are doing (driving, studying, between classes, partying)

This diary will help you identify your triggers which are life cues that cause you to light up. Identify your strongest triggers (those are the times, when you need your fix the most). When you quit you will develop a plan to deal with those triggers without using tobacco.

Now that you know why you use tobacco, start writing down the reasons why you want to quit:

Need some help? Here’s a list to get you started:

Cost
The average cost for a pack of cigarettes in California is $4. Go to
http://www.tobaccofreeu.org to find out how much you are spending on your habit.

The Social Factor
Studies have shown that most college students would rather date, live and hang out with non-smokers. In addition, stricter laws continue to be enacted, restricting where people can smoke. Wouldn’t’t it be better for your mental health and social life to quit for good?

Make A Statement About Who You Are and What You Believe In!
What do you stand for? Your generation is the most environmentally and politically conscious since the 1960’s and your use (or non-use) of tobacco is an assertion of your beliefs. Consider these facts:

  • Almost half of the items collected in the annual beach clean-up in California are cigarette butts.
  • About 75% of all the land used to grow tobacco is in developing countries where starvation is more common than in Western countries.
  • Making cigarettes leads to deforestation, soil erosion, flooding, the greenhouse effect, and global warming.
  • The fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides used to grow tobacco get into the soil, polluting waterways and food chains and poisoning livestock, food crops, and farm workers.
  • Child labor is widespread in all major tobacco producing countries including: Argentina, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Malawi, Mexico and Zimbabwe.
  • In Brazil, almost 70% of the tobacco farm workers are under the age of 18.
  • The land used in Asia to produce tobacco could provide food for 10-20 million people.
  • In Mexico, an Indian tribe called the Huicholes has been almost completely destroyed because of working in tobacco fields and being exposed to harmful pesticides.
  • Whether you are passionate about the environment, the eradication of starvation, children’s rights or all of the above your decision to quit using tobacco is a positive statement about your refusal to support an industry that relies on the exploitation of the earth and its people.
  • What else? There are so many more reasons to quit. What are yours?
  • Write a list of all of your reasons. Pick your top 3-5 to write on a small card and keep with you as a reminder of why you are quitting

Develop your Quit Plan

Now that you know you want to quit, the first step is to SET YOUR QUIT DATE. Ideally you should give yourself one-two weeks to start preparing. Since quitting tobacco can be stressful, ideally you want to set your quit date during a less stressful time in your life (like after finals!).

Here are some things to do to prepare:

  • Consider medication or Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT).
  • These can help you quit by lessening your urge to use tobacco. Here is an overview of what’s available:pills
  • Bupropion SR (Zyban, Wellbutrin)—Available by prescription.
  • Nicotine gum—Available over-the-counter.
  • Nicotine inhaler—Available by prescription.
  • Nicotine nasal spray—Available by prescription.
  • Nicotine patch—Available by prescription and over-the-counter.
  • Nicotine lozenge—Available over-the-counter.
  • Varenicline tartrate (Chantix)—Available by prescription.

For more detailed information on tobacco cessation visit lungusa.org

  • Please note the following about smoking cessation medication and NRT:
  • Ask your health care provider for advice about which of these is best for you and carefully read the information on the package.
  • All of these medications will at least double your chances of quitting and quitting for good.
  • Nearly everyone who is trying to quit can benefit from using a medication. However, if you are pregnant or trying to become pregnant, nursing, under age 18, smoking fewer than 10 cigarettes per day, or have a medical condition, talk to your doctor or other health care provider before taking medications.

Adapted from cdc.gov

Prepare for the Urge

Remember that tobacco diary you kept? Now’s the time to take it out and start working on a plan to handle those stronger urges. Here are some ideas:

Triggers and  Plans:

  • In the car
    • Bring a healthy snack/drink with you
    • Call a friend (using your hands-free device of course!)
    • Play your favorite CD/music
  • Between Classes
    • Have a healthy snack/drink
    • Go straight to your next class and read
    • Go to the library/union and study
    • Take a walk with a non-smoking friend
  • Hanging out at home/Bored
    • Call a friend
    • Watch TV/Play on the computer
    • Take a walk/Exercise
    • Read
  • Out Partying
    • Stay inside the club/house the whole night
    • Drink water or another non-alcoholic beverage
    • Make other plans with friends that don’t involve drinking
  • Stress
    • Take a Walk
    • Practice Yoga
    • Deep Breathing
    • Exercise

The possibilities are endless. To find more ideas for coping with triggers visit http://www.determinedtoquit.com or
quitsmoking.about.com.

Practice makes perfect…

Now that you have set your quit date you should start “practicing” being a non-smoker by incorporating the following changes to your habit. Trust us, it will make things much easier when your quit day comes:

  • Wait 10 extra minutes for your first cigarette of the day.
  • Lock your cigs in the trunk of the car when you drive anywhere.
  • Drink one extra glass of water per day.
  • Eat one extra fruit and vegetable every day.
  • Wait 10 extra minutes after each meal to smoke/dip.
  • Skip smoking during short breaks between classes. Go straight to your next class.
  • Start carrying healthy snacks, gum and mints with you.
  • Don’t smoke at parties/bars.
  • Put off smoking when you get an urge for 5-10 minutes. Deep breathe instead.
  • Start studying/working on a project without lighting up first.
  • When you are feeling stressed take five deep breaths to relax

Getting Support- group of friends

Now that you have decided to quit you need to enlist some help. Think about who is going to be able to support you when the urge gets bad, who you can call to talk you through it (family, friends, roommates, partner). This person is a good listener, caring and compassionate, and is someone who is willing to do a little research to understand what you will be going through and how they can best help you. Ideally it is someone who doesn’t use tobacco. Once you’ve identified these people you need to talk to them about the decision you have made to quit, what you expect it will be like and the best (and most specific) ways they can help you stay tobacco free. This is also a good opportunity for you to let your smoking friends know that you won’t be joining them on “smoke-breaks” any longer, and that you would appreciate it if they wouldn’t ask you to!

Here’s a list of websites for advice on how your friends and family can support you:

American Lung Association- How to Help a Friend Quit Smoking
AOL Health-Help Your Loved One Quit Smoking
Web MD- Quitting smoking: Helping someone quit

Other Preparation Ideas

Here is a list of some other things that will help you get ready for the big day!

  • If you smoke inside your house/apartment-stop! Move your ashtrays (and habit) outside!
  • Clean out your car/home (hint: you are looking for any stray cigs that might be hiding in the nooks and crannies)
  • Stock up on healthy snacks
  • Make a dentist appointment so you have a fresh, clean mouth to quit with!
  • Start exercising-if you do not work out regularly start out with a thirty minute walk 2 -3 times a week.

Plan to keep busy. Since a lot of people smoke/chew when they’re bored make sure you keep yourself busy that first week!

Quit Day!

All right, you’ve done all the prep work to get here so here it goes!

  • Throw out all of your cigarettes, lighters, ashtrays and any other items you use to smoke or your chew the night before your quit day. That way you will already have eight hours of quit time when you wake up!
  • Don’t buy or bum any cigarettes/chew!
  • Hang out in places where you can’t smoke-movies, mall, University Union, Library, class.
  • Stay away from people and places where you used to smoke.
  • Stay busy.
  • If you get an urge have your back-up plan ready!
  • And remember…

The urge will pass whether you smoke or not!

Rewards

We saved the best for last. Part of your quit plan is to make sure you take really great care of yourself for being a non-smoker/chewer. Research shows that positive reinforcement is the best way to     encourage a new habit so you need to reward yourself for all of your hard work! Here are some ideas:

  • Day One  
    • Download a new ringtone or song
    • Go to the movies or out to eat
    • Find an old friend on Facebook
  • Day Two
    • Download another new song
    • Coffee drink or smoothie
    • Spend one hour reading for pleasure
  • Day Three
    • Rent a movie
    • Ice cream or frozen yogurt
    • One hour of watching funny videos on You Tube
  • Day Four
    • Take a nap
    • Spend some time in a park, museum or on a beach
    • Call someone you haven’t talked to in awhile
  • Day Five
    • Download another new song
    • Doughnut or another pastry treat
    • Watch a favorite TV show you never have time for
  • Day Six
    • Rent another movie
    • Make yourself a nice dinner
    • Spend one hour reading for pleasure
  • Day Seven-ONE WEEK!
    • Have a manicure/pedicure
    • Get a massage
    • Go to a comedy show
    • Go out on a date
    • Get a facial
    • Go out to dinner
    • Go shopping

You should give yourself at least one small reward every day you are quit for the first month and give yourself a generous reward to celebrate each week you are tobacco-free. And celebrate with something special at least once per month until it’s been one year.

Living your tobacco-free life

There will come a day when you don’t even think about tobacco. We know it seems a ways away but millions of people have kicked the habit and so will you. You are doing such a great job but what if the unmentionable happens, and you slip? Remember Slip does NOT mean failure. You learned how to smoke and now you are learning how to quit, which is bound to come with some set-backs. The most important thing for you to know is that the recipe for success at anything means never quit trying. So never quit quitting, and if you do slip look at what made you do so and you will be ready for next time!

For more resources on Quitting Tobacco check out the following websites:

Smokefree.gov

Created by the Tobacco Control Research Branch of the National Cancer Institute, in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. This comprehensive site provides an online guide as well as downloadable resources to quitting smoking.

Clearing the Air: Quit Smoking Today
An online booklet that guides a smoker through the day-to-day process of becoming a non-smoker is available from the National Cancer Institute. The document describes practical, step-by-step approaches and techniques for preparing yourself for quitting, understanding the ways of quitting, knowing what to expect on the day you quit, and lots more. Referrals to additional information and resources are included.

Quit Smoking Action Plan
From The American Lung Association’s Tobacco Control Website providing information on how to quit smoking, including a Quit Smoking Action Plan and a Nicotine Replacement Therapy Fact Sheet.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Tobacco Information and Prevention Source
Current tobacco-related news, educational materials, and guides to help you quit smoking.

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Hooka Facts

Hooka Facts


What is hookah?

Hookah is a tobacco pipe of Near Eastern origin with a long, flexible tube by which the smoke is drawn through a jar of water and then cooled.

Facts:

  • Hookah contains 5 times more cancer causing agents than cigarettes.
  • Hookah use can cause nicotine addiction.
  • Hookah contains 100 times more tar than cigarettes.
  • Hookah use can lead to mouth cancer.
  • Hookah contains 69 different carcinogens.
  • Hookah use may lead to infertility.
  • Hookah contains 11 times more carbon monoxide than cigarettes.
  • Hookah use may cause impotence.
  • Hookah contains 4 times more nicotine than cigarettes.
  • Hookah users may become infected with herpes.
  • Hookah use may cause gum disease and wrinkles.

Myth vs. Reality

MYTH: Hookah smoke is better for you than cigarette smoke and not addictive.Man smoking
REALITY: Hookah smoke of various fruity flavors, tastes, and aromas can be even more harmful than disease-causing cigarette tobacco smoke. And, hookah smoke contains four times more nicotine (an addictive drug) than cigarette smoke. Some people can become addicted to nicotine after using any form of tobacco just a few times, including hookah.

MYTH: Smoking hookah is less harmful than cigarettes because the smoke passes through water which filters out the chemicals and other bad stuff.
REALITY: When hookah bubbles through water at the base of a hookah pipe it cools the smoke, but does not filter any chemicals out of the smoke. This “cooling” process forces a hookah smoker to inhale twice as deep as a cigarette smoker which causes chemicals, cancer causing agents, and other harmful elements to penetrate deeper into the lungs. Additionally, the charcoal that is used to burn the tobacco contains three times more carbon monoxide than cigarettes. Inhaling carbon monoxide can create serious breathing problems.

MYTH: Smoking hookah is just so much fun, relaxing, and social. It’s not like I do it every day.
REALITY: Hanging out with friends and smoking hookah may seem fun. However, the reality is 30 minutes of hookah smoking is the same as chain smoking a half a pack of cigarettes. So even smoking hookah once in a while can lead to addiction. Additionally, when you share mouthpieces you add the risk of getting colds, viruses like herpes, oral bacteria infections, and tuberculosis.

Source:

Asotra, Kamlesh. Hooked on Hookah? What You Don’t Know Can Kill You. Burning Issues: Tobacco’s Hottest Topics.
Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program Newsletter 7, no. 3 (2005) 1-10.

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

General Tobacco Information

General Tobacco Information


The Tobacco Industry wants you!

You are “The Replacements”

  • “Young adult smokers are the only source of replacement smokers.”
  • Source: RJR Tobacco Company, Bates No. 503170243
  • 28% of college smokers began to smoke regularly at or after age 19, at which point most were already in college. (Ibid.)
  • Almost 1 in 8 college students initiate smoking while in college (Everett and Huston, 1999; Wechsler et al., 1998; Wetter, et al., 2004). http://www.trdrp.org

Tobacco Marketing to College Aged Youth

When the 1998 Master Settlement Agreement prohibited tobacco advertising to children under the age of 18, the tobacco industry intensified its marketing efforts towards 18-24 year olds. Perhaps not coincidentally, young adults are now the only age group in which smoking rates are rising rather than falling. Advertising in the college and alternative press and bar promotions which involve the distribution of free cigarettes are some of the ways in which the tobacco industry targets college-aged youth. (http://www.ttac.org)

source: www.tobaccofreekids.org

Dead Sexy?

Tobacco companies target women and girls using aggressive advertising that exploits the images of beauty, independence, empowerment, slimness, and sex appeal. Check out tobaccofreekids.org for a closer look at what they are doing.

source: www.tobaccofreekids.org

Toughness and Masculinity

Images such as the Marlboro Man equate smoking with a macho ruggedness that is appealing to men and boys. This theme mirrors the pressures many men and boys face to be “tough”. Boys may believe that smoking will give them the aura of coolness they are searching for. Check out youthdevelopment.suite101.com for more information.

source: www.tobaccofreekids.org

Social Smoking

"I don't smoke except when I'm out with my friends or at a party."

Social smoking is a phenomenon that has become most popular among college students and other young adults. Social smoking primarily occurs in social settings, such as at parties, nightclubs, coffee shops, etc. Social smokers do not tend to smoke when they are alone. Most people who smoke socially do not identify themselves as “smokers” and believe they can quit smoking whenever they want.

source: www.tobaccofreekids.org

Social Smoking Facts

A University of Wisconsin (2004) study published in the American Psychological Association Journal of Health Psychology found that almost 90% of college students who were daily smokers and 50% of occasional smokers were still smoking four years later. (http://www.aadac.com)

In one study, approximately half of young people who began smoking "casually" or "socially" were smoking every day within one year. Smoking cigarettes only occasionally can lead to a daily smoking pattern and addiction to nicotine. (http://www.goaskalice.columbia.edu/2573.html)

source: www.tobaccofreekids.org

Social Smoking is a Tobacco Industry Marketing Tactic

Since as early as the 1970’s tobacco industry marketers used the concept of “social smoking” to appeal to and manipulate consumers to start and continue smoking in order to combat the negative health information that was becoming more widely known and accepted in the United States. Following are excerpts from a Brown and Williamson (Kool brand cigarettes) memo about how marketing the idea of “social smoking” could keep people smoking:

In 1977 B & W began a ‘Social Smoking Project’ where the object was to “provide smokers with strong reasons to continue smoking.” This project was made in response to the government’s negative findings regarding effects of smoking on health and was built on “physical and psychological defenses.” An example of their physical defense was to engineer a cigarette that gave off no secondhand smoke and examples of the psychological defenses were to create “a more positive self image,” and to give “more positive perceptions of the smoking habit” to users.

The memo can be found at www.legacy.library.ucsf.edu/

source: www.tobaccofreekids.org

For more information on tobacco, smoking and nicotine check out these websites:

Nicotine Addiction

How Stuff Works
An online source of credible, unbiased, and easy-to-understand explanations of how the world actually works.

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
NIDA's mission is to lead the Nation in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction.

Tobacco Industry

Trinkets and Trash
The online surveillance system and archive of tobacco products and tobacco industry marketing materials.

Truth in Advertising
Collection of vintage cigarette ads.

UCSF Legacy Tobacco Documents Library (LTDL)
Search, view, and download more than 10 million documents created by the tobacco industry concerning scientific research, manufacturing, marketing, advertising, and sales of cigarettes. Sponsored by the American Legacy Foundation.

Infect Truth
The Truth Campaign: This is the organization behind those cool anti-tobacco industry ads we all love. Dedicated to exposing the lies, manipulations and products of the tobacco industry.

Sacramento Taking Action Against Nicotine Dependence (STAND)
Kicking some serious butts on the streets of Sacramento.

Tobacco and Health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Committed to achieving true improvements in people’s lives by accelerating health impact and reducing health disparities.

American Heart Association
Mission is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

Mayo Clinic
Providing information and services from the world's first and largest integrated, not-for-profit group medical practice.

Tobacco Free California
Learn about the dangers of secondhand smoke and how youth are impacted by tobacco marketing, illegal sales of cigarettes and smoking in the movies.

Tobacco Related Disease and Research Program (TRDRP)
Dedicated to the support research that focuses on the prevention, causes, and treatment of tobacco-related disease and the reduction of the human and economic costs of tobacco use in California.

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Marijuana Facts

Marijuana Facts


What is marijuana?

Marijuana is the dried flowers, leaves and stems of the Cannabis sativa plant. The main active chemical ingredient in marijuana is Tetrahyarocannibinol (THC). Marijuana can range from 1% to 8% THC.  THC is a fat soluble substance and can remain in the fat, lungs and brain tissue for up to 3 weeks or longer depending on frequency of use.

How is marijuana used?

Marijuana is usually smoked using a pipe, a bong or by rolling a joint or blunt. Blunts are cigars that are emptied of tobacco and refilled with marijuana, sometimes in combination with other drugs. Marijuana can also be eaten in food, for example, by baking it into brownies.

Is it possible to overdose on marijuana?

It is virtually impossible to die as a result of overdosing on marijuana; however, it is possible to achieve a level of intoxication that is no longer an enjoyable experience.

Is marijuana addictive?

For a small percentage of people who use it, marijuana can be highly addictive. It is estimated that 10% to 14% of users will become heavily dependent. More than 120,000 people in the US seek treatment for marijuana addiction every year. Because the consequences of marijuana use can be subtle and insidious, it is more difficult to recognize signs of addiction. Cultural and societal beliefs that marijuana cannot be addictive make it less likely for people to seek help or to get support for quitting.

More and more studies are finding that marijuana has addictive properties. Both animal and human studies show physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms from marijuana including irritability, restlessness, insomnia, nausea and intense dreams. Tolerance to marijuana also builds up rapidly. Heavy users need 8 times higher doses to get the same effects as infrequent users.

How do I recognize a problem with marijuana?

Some warning signs are:

  • More frequent use
  • Needing more and more to get the same effect
  • Spending time thinking about using marijuana
  • Spending more money than you have on it
  • Missing class or failing to finish assignments because of marijuana
  • Making new friends who use and neglecting old friends who don't
  • Finding it's hard to be happy without it

Because THC is fat soluble and remains in the body for up to 3 weeks, it's important to remember that withdrawal symptoms might not be felt immediately.

Why do people use marijuana?

Smoking marijuana can relax a person and elevate their mood. This can be followed by drowsiness and sedation. Other effects include heightened sensory awareness, euphoria, altered perceptions and feeling hungry ("the munchies"). Higher concentrations of THC may produce a more hallucinogenic response.

What are the short-term effects of marijuana use?

Discomforts associated with smoking marijuana include dry mouth, dry eyes, increased heart rate and visible signs of intoxication such as bloodshot eyes and puffy eyelids. Other problems include:

  • Impaired memory and ability to learn
  • Difficulty thinking and problem solving
  • Anxiety attacks or feelings of paranoia
  • Impaired muscle coordination and judgment
  • Increased susceptibility to infections
  • Dangerous impairment of motor (driving) skills. Studies show that it impairs braking time, attention to traffic signals and other driving behaviors.
  • Cardiac problems for people with heart disease or high blood pressure, because marijuana increases the heart rate

Are there long-term consequences to smoking marijuana?

Yes. Long-term consequences to smoking marijuana include respiratory problems, difficulties with memory and learning, and fertility issues.

Respiratory problems

Someone who smokes marijuana regularly can have many of the same respiratory problems as cigarette smokers. Persistent coughing, symptoms of bronchitis and more frequent chest colds are possible symptoms. There are over 400 chemicals that have been found in marijuana smoke. One of the 400 chemicals in marijuana smoke is benzyprene, which is a known human carcinogen (agents that are shown to cause cancer).  Regardless of the THC content, the amount of tar inhaled by marijuana smokers and the level of carbon monoxide are 3 to 5 times higher than in cigarette smoke. This is most likely due to inhaling marijuana more deeply, holding the smoke in the lungs and because marijuana smoke is unfiltered.

Memory and learning

Recent research shows that regular marijuana use compromises the ability to learn and to remember information by impairing the ability to focus, sustain, and shift attention. One study also found that long-term use reduces the ability to organize and integrate complex information.
In addition, marijuana impairs short-term memory and decreases motivation to accomplish tasks, even after the high is over. In one study, even small doses impaired the ability to recall words from a list seen 20 minutes earlier.

Fertility

Long-term marijuana use suppresses the production of hormones that help regulate the reproductive system. For men, this can cause decreased sperm counts and very heavy users can experience erectile dysfunction. Women may experience irregular periods from heavy marijuana use.

Is marijuana illegal?

Yes, marijuana is illegal and its possession, use, and sale can carry fines and disciplinary consequences at Sacramento State. The Sacramento State Alcoholic Beverage and Drug Policy states that: Except as expressly permitted by law or University regulations the use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of illegal drugs or drug-related paraphernalia, or the misuse of legal pharmaceutical drugs is prohibited.

What about the medical use of marijuana?

Marijuana's ability to enhance appetite has led to its medical use to reduce the physical wasting caused by AIDS and to reduce nausea for chemotherapy patients. According to the Marijuana Policy Project, 11 states have laws that allow patients to use medical marijuana despite the prohibition by federal law.
Although Sacramento State follows California State laws, the campus also follows federal laws regarding medicinal marijuana.  Federal law prohibits the use of medical marijuana and therefore Sacramento State prohibits the use of medicinal marijuana on campus.

Source: www.brown.edu

 

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Predatory Drugs

Predatory Drugs


Rape is a crime of power and control.  It is one of the worst crimes that can be committed, and yet, surprisingly enough, the criminal element in our society has found a way to make it even worse.

GHB, Rohypnol, and Ketamine are all drugs that have been identified by the FBI as being used to perpetrate sexual assault and other crimes and are therefore referred to as “predatory drugs”.  These are not the only drugs used to facilitated sexual assault.  Many over the counter drugs and some prescription sleep aids are being used as well.  The FBI, to date, has identified over 52 drugs used to facilitate sexual assault.

These drugs can mentally and physically paralyze an individual; these effects are intensified when the drug is combined with alcohol, making them desirable drugs for predators to use as an aid in committing rape.  Without the ability to recall the sexual assault or rape, a victim of these drug-facilitated assaults is hindered to assist law enforcement officials in providing information to assist in the prosecution or even apprehension of the rapist.

The FBI, to date, has identified over 52 drugs used to facilitate sexual assault.  What follows is an explanation of some of the more popular drugs used in sexual assaults.  Do keep in mind, these drugs may be used recreationally.  If you believe that you were assaulted while using drugs recreationally, please go to the hospital for help.

Alcohol alone is the number one predatory drug.

Alcohol

  • Alcohol is the most commonly used “predatory drug”
  • A National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) 2002 report on college drinking estimates that more than 70,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 survive alcohol-related sexual assault or rape each year.
  •  Alcohol dulls the senses, inhibits clear thinking, distorts judgment, can cause blackouts, can cause loss of control physically and consciously, and can increase tendency towards violence or aggressiveness.

Please, if you chose to drink use the buddy system.  Be with friends that you can count on to watch out for you. Check out our No Woman Left Behind Campaign for more information.

For more information on alcohol visit the Alcohol Information page.

GHB

Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (GHB) is an illegal drug and is commonly called by the street names Liquid Ecstasy, Scoop, Easy Lay, Georgia Home Boy, Grievous Bodily Harm, Liquid X, and Goop. It’s most common form is a colorless, odorless liquid, but it can also be a white powder material. This drug is taken orally, and often mixed with alcohol. GHB is most notably used as a “club drug” among teens and young adults, but has been used by body builders for its alleged anabolic effects.  GHB has been used in the commission of sexual assaults and other crimes because it renders the victim incapable of resisting, and commonly causes memory problems that could complicate case prosecution.

Using GHB in minimal amounts can result in drowsiness, dizziness, nausea, and visual disturbances. The feeling of rapid intoxication is common. Larger doses result in unconsciousness, seizures, severe respiratory depression, coma and death. Overdoses usually require emergency room treatment, including intensive care for respiratory depression and coma. A great deal of misinformation is published on the internet, including directions for drug use and handling an overdose.

**Important: There is no safe way to use GHB. If you suspect that you may have ingested GHB, get help immediately. If you think a friend has overdosed on GHB, call 911 immediately.

Rohypnol

Flunitrazepam (Rohypnol) is an illegal drug and is commonly called by the street names R-2, Mexican Valium, rophies, roofies and circles.  Rohypnol is usually taken orally, but can also be crushed and snorted.  It is known as a predatory drug, as well as a recreational drug that is being used at night clubs and raves. Rohypnol is manufactured as a 1-milligram, olive green, oblong tablet, imprinted with the number 542. The new tablet includes a dye that, according to Hoffman-La Roche (the makers of Rohypnol) will be visible if it is slipped into a drink, although predators may utilize blue tropical drinks and punches in which the blue dye can be disguised.

One of the significant effects of the drug is anterograde amnesia, a factor that strongly contributed to its inclusion in the Drug-Induced Rape Prevention and Punishment Act of 1996. Anterograde amnesia is a condition in which events that occurred while under the influence of the drug are forgotten.  This is a prominent complication in prosecuting sexual assault cases involving Rohypnol.  In addition to the chemically induced amnesia, Rohypnol often causes decreased blood pressure, drowsiness, visual disturbances, dizziness, confusion, gastrointestinal disturbances, and urinary retention.

Green Rohypnol pill (The new green pill)

White Rohypnol Pill (The old white pill)

Ketamine

Ketamine is a medication approved for marketing in the U.S., primarily for use in veterinary medicine. It is commonly called by the street names jet, super acid, Special “K”, green, K, and cat Valium.  Ketamine comes in a clear liquid and a white or off-white powder form. It is a tranquilizer most commonly used on animals in veterinary clinics, but is also used as a recreational drug at night clubs and raves. Ketamine is used by perpetrators of sexual assault because of the amnesia effect experienced by the victim.  The liquid form of the drug can be injected, consumed in drinks, or added to smokable materials. Use of the drug can cause delirium, amnesia, depression, and long-term memory and cognitive difficulties. Higher doses produce an effect referred to as “K-Hole,” an “out of body,” or “near-death” experience.

A few things to consider in reducing your risk of drug facilitated sexual assault

  • Don’t leave beverages unattended.
  • Don’t accept drinks, including soda and water, from someone who you don’t know well and trust.
  • When at a bar or club, only accept drinks from the bartender or waiter.
  • When at parties, do not accept opened drinks or drinks from a common source (such as a punch bowl) from anyone.
  • Always go to parties and bars with friends.  Perpetrators are less likely to rape someone if they know that their potential victim is with a group of people who are watching out for her.  Make sure that everyone who came together leaves together.

Help is available

If you think that you have been drugged and/or assaulted…

  • Get to a safe place and call 911.  It is important to remember that as a sexual assault victim your body and clothing is evidence.  Do not shower, douche, brush your teeth, change your clothes or urinate (for some drugs it is possible to detect them only in the first urine after ingestion).
  • Ask a trusted friend to stay with you until help arrives.
  • If you do not want to call the police you can contact your local rape crisis center for information and referrals.  Your call is confidential.
  • To locate the center closest to you please call the 24-hour National Rape Crisis Hotline operated thought the Rape Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN) at 1-800-656-HOPE.  You may also visit their website at http://www.rainn.org.
  • Resources are also available through Sacramento State Violence and Sexual Assault Support Services.

For more information on predatory drugs; we suggest the following websites:

Project GHB
www.projectghb.org

The National Institute on Drug Abuse
www.nida.nih.gov

Club Drugs.org
www.clubdrugs.org

“Watch Your Drink-Watch Your Friends” Campaign

Because of the continued increase in drug facilitated sexual assault and the dangers faced by women and men alike, the Doris Tate Crime Victims Foundation (CA)  and the Women’s Resource Center at California State University Sacramento (CA) have collaborated to provide an educational campaign called "Watch Your Drink -Watch Your Friends”.  This campaign is designed to educate people on the dangers of predatory drugs and how to obtain help if someone thinks they have been drugged.

For information on the  “Watch Your Drink-Watch Your Friends” campaign visit www.ican-foundation.org

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

General Drug Informaiton

General Drug Informaiton


Sac State Statistics:

Did you know?! Most Sac State students (76%) have not used marijuana in the last 30 days.  
Most Sac State students (85%) choose not to use marijuana (Sacramento State Core Survey 2006)

  • In 2002 15.70% of Sac State students said that they had used marijuana in the last 30 days.
  • In 2005 13.09% of Sac State students said that they had used marijuana in the last 30 days.
  • In 2006 14.40% of Sac State students said that they had used marijuana in the last 30 days.

Source: Sacramento State Core Survey (2002, 2005 & 2006)

Information on Specific Drugs:

The body of knowledge surrounding drug use and abuse is rapidly growing. Our website provides information specific to marijuana and predatory drugs. However, in order to gain the most up to date information, we recommend visiting the following websites for information on specific drugs.

Drug Enforcement Agency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Facts on Tap

Myth or Fact?

Myth: Combining drugs is not harmful.
Fact: Overdose and death can occur as a result of combining drugs! Examples include: mixing certain prescription drugs together or combining illegal drugs with alcohol. Because of these risks, treatment centers are recommended for recovery assistance.
source:www.casapalmera.com

Myth: Addicts cannot recover|
Fact: Many people successfully overcome their addictions at drug treatment facilities. Though this is not the case with everyone, a proper drug rehab program and abstinence from drugs make a successful comeback possible.
source: www.casapalmera.com

Myth: Other than alcohol, driving is not affected by the influence of drugs.
Fact: Many drugs impair coordination, weaken muscles, affect attention span and judgment, as well as blur your vision and distort the area around you. These are particularly dangerous when you’re driving! Also statistics state that a driver with an alcohol concentration above 0.05 faces the same risks as someone under the influence of cannabis or an amphetamine based substance.
source: www.casapalmera.com

Myth:  If you get drunk, coffee will sober you up.
Fact: Once alcohol is in the bloodstream only time will make a person sober.  And, contrary to popular belief, a cold shower will not work either! 
source: www.relevancyinc.com

Myth: Cocaine is only addictive if you inject it.
Fact: Cocaine is quickly addictive any way it is used - smoking, snorting or injecting.
source: www.relevancyinc.com

Myth: Snuff and chewing tobacco are safe because there’s no smoke.
Fact: Smokeless tobacco can cause mouth and throat cancer, high blood pressure and dental problems. It can also lessen the senses of taste and smell and cause bad breath.
source: www.relevancyinc.com

Myth: Hookah is not that bad for me and is much better than cigarettes.
Fact: Smoking a waterpipe, or hookah, exposes the user to many dangerous toxins known to cause lung cancer, heart disease, and other dangerous diseases. In one hookah session that typically lasts about twenty minutes to an hour, the smoker inhales about 100 times as much smoke as one would smoking a single cigarette.
source: www.who.int

Myth: You can’t get addicted to marijuana.
Fact: People can get hooked on pot! Research shows that marijuana use can lead to addiction. Each year, more kids enter treatment with a primary diagnosis of marijuana dependence than for all other illegal drugs combined.
source: www.theantidrug.com

Myth: Methamphetamine causes holes in the brain.
Fact: It is true that methamphetamine changes the way the brain functions. However, functional MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans showing brain activity depict areas of low or no activity as “holes.” These scans depict functional changes, not the actual structure of the brain. In other words, the apparent “holes” in the image indicate areas in the brain that are inactive, not holes in the structure of the brain.
source: www.menotmeth.org

Myth: Using drugs cannot kill brain cells.
Fact: Binge drinking, consuming 4-5 drinks in a two hour period, and ecstasy are proven to kill brain cells.  Heavy consumption of alcohol can lead to neurodegeneration, death of brain cells and reduced brain tissue mass, and subsequent damaging effects such as a lack of impulse control and difficulty in setting goals.
Research in animals links MDMA (ecstasy) exposure to long-term damage to neurons that are involved in mood, thinking, and judgment. A study in nonhuman primates showed that exposure to MDMA for only 4 days caused damage to serotonin nerve terminals that was evident 6 to 7 years later. While similar neurotoxicity has not been definitively shown in humans, the wealth of animal research indicating MDMA’s damaging properties suggests that MDMA is not a safe drug for human consumption.

Sources:
www.preventdisease.com
www.usdoj.gov/dea

Myth: Using prescription drugs is always healthy.
Fact: Pharmaceuticals taken without a prescription or a doctor’s supervision can be just as dangerous as taking illicit drugs or alcohol.  Every drug, prescription or not, has an effect on the body.
source: www.drugfree.org

 

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Other Drug Information

Other Drug Information


Sac State Statistics:
Did you know?! Most Sac State students (76%) have not used marijuana in the last 30 days.    

Most Sac State students (85%) choose not to use marijuana (Sacramento State Core Survey 2006)

  In 2002 15.70% of Sac State students said that they had used marijuana in the last 30 days.
  In 2005 13.09% of Sac State students said that they had used marijuana in the last 30 days.
  In 2006 14.40% of Sac State students said that they had used marijuana in the last 30 days.

Source: Sacramento State Core Survey (2002, 2005 & 2006)

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Information on Specific Drugs:


The body of knowledge surrounding drug use and abuse is rapidly growing. Our website provides information specific to marijuana and predatory drugs. However, in order to gain the most up to date information, we recommend visiting the following websites for information on specific drugs.

Drug Enforcement Agency

National Institute on Drug Abuse

Facts on Tap

 

(back to top)

 

Myth or Fact?


Myth: Combining drugs is not harmful.
Overdose and death can occur as a result of combining drugs! Examples include: mixing certain prescription drugs together or combining illegal drugs with alcohol. Because of these risks, treatment centers are recommended for recovery assistance.
source:www.casapalmera.com


Myth: Addicts cannot recover.
Many people successfully overcome their addictions at drug treatment facilities. Though this is not the case with everyone, a proper drug rehab program and abstinence from drugs make a successful comeback possible.
source: www.casapalmera.com


Myth: Other than alcohol, driving is not affected by the influence of drugs.
Many drugs impair coordination, weaken muscles, affect attention span and judgment, as well as blur your vision and distort the area around you. These are particularly dangerous when you’re driving! Also statistics state that a driver with an alcohol concentration above 0.05 faces the same risks as someone under the influence of cannabis or an amphetamine based substance.
source: www.casapalmera.com


Myth:  If you get drunk, coffee will sober you up.
Fact  Once alcohol is in the bloodstream only time will make a person sober.  And, contrary to popular belief, a cold shower will not work either!  
source: www.relevancyinc.com


Myth: Cocaine is only addictive if you inject it.
Fact  Cocaine is quickly addictive any way it is used - smoking, snorting or injecting.
source: www.relevancyinc.com


Myth: Snuff and chewing tobacco are safe because there’s no smoke.
Fact  Smokeless tobacco can cause mouth and throat cancer, high blood pressure and dental problems. It can also lessen the senses of taste and smell and cause bad breath.
source: www.relevancyinc.com


Myth: Hookah is not that bad for me and is much better than cigarettes.
Smoking a waterpipe, or hookah, exposes the user to many dangerous toxins known to cause lung cancer, heart disease, and other dangerous diseases. In one hookah session that typically lasts about twenty minutes to an hour, the smoker inhales about 100 times as much smoke as one would smoking a single cigarette.
source: www.who.int


Myth: You can’t get addicted to marijuana.
FACT: People can get hooked on pot! Research shows that marijuana use can lead to addiction. Each year, more kids enter treatment with a primary diagnosis of marijuana dependence than for all other illegal drugs combined.
source: www.theantidrug.com


Myth: Methamphetamine causes holes in the brain.
FACT: It is true that methamphetamine changes the way the brain functions. However, functional MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans showing brain activity depict areas of low or no activity as “holes.” These scans depict functional changes, not the actual structure of the brain. In other words, the apparent “holes” in the image indicate areas in the brain that are inactive, not holes in the structure of the brain.
source: www.menotmeth.org


Myth: Using drugs cannot kill brain cells.
Fact: Binge drinking, consuming 4-5 drinks in a two hour period, and ecstasy are proven to kill brain cells.  Heavy consumption of alcohol can lead to neurodegeneration, death of brain cells and reduced brain tissue mass, and subsequent damaging effects such as a lack of impulse control and difficulty in setting goals.
Research in animals links MDMA (ecstasy) exposure to long-term damage to neurons that are involved in mood, thinking, and judgment. A study in nonhuman primates showed that exposure to MDMA for only 4 days caused damage to serotonin nerve terminals that was evident 6 to 7 years later. While similar neurotoxicity has not been definitively shown in humans, the wealth of animal research indicating MDMA’s damaging properties suggests that MDMA is not a safe drug for human consumption.

sources:
www.preventdisease.com
www.usdoj.gov/dea


Myth: Using prescription drugs is always healthy.
Fact: Pharmaceuticals taken without a prescription or a doctor’s supervision can be just as dangerous as taking illicit drugs or alcohol.  Every drug, prescription or not, has an effect on the body.
source: www.drugfree.org

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For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Policies

Policies


Alcohol and Other Drug Policy

Sacramento State University recognizes that the abuse of alcohol and other drugs is a threat to the mission of this institution and to the members of this University community. Students, faculty and staff have a mutual interest and shared responsibility to preserve, communicate, advance knowledge, cultivate wisdom, encourage creativity, and promote values ensuring the survival of humankind and improving the quality of life.

The following policy and procedures set regulations for the use of alcohol as well as delineate the prohibition of the use of illicit drugs. This policy supercedes all other previous policies (UMA 00550) regarding the use of alcoholic beverages at Sacramento State University.

Tobacco Policy

Sacramento State policy states that a person cannot smoke in or within 20 feet of all buildings or on major walkways on campus.

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Resources

Resources


Campus and Community Information

Emergency: 9-1-1

Sacramento City Police (Non Emergency): 264-5471
Sac State Police (Non Emergency): 278-6851
Sac County Sheriff (Non Emergency): 684-2000
Sacramento State Student Health Center : 278-6461
Sacramento Sate Women’s Resource Center: 278-7388
Sacramento State Violence & Sexual Assault Support Services Program: (916) 278-3799
Sacramento State Psychological Counseling Services: 278-6416
Planned Parenthood: 1-800-230-PLAN

Need A Ride?

ASI Safe Rides: (916) 278- TAXI (8294)
(Thursday-Saturday, 10pm-2am)

Designated Drivers Association: (916) 335-5555
(Friday- Saturday, 10pm-2am)

Taxi Cab Service(National Dispatch Service): 1-800-TAXICAB

General Links

Family Health Productions
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Health Services at Columbia Columbia University’s Health Q&A Internet Service
AddictHelp.com
Treatment4Addiction.com

Alcohol Related Links

Alcoholism at About.com
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation
Mothers Against Drunk Driving
Alcohol Problems and Solutions State University of New York, Potsdam
Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies
Center for Substance Abuse Research
Facts on Tap
National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI)
National Commission Against Drunk Driving
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Other Drug Related Links

National Institute on Drug Abuse
Rohypnol
Club Drugs
National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign
Partnership for a Drug-Free America

Tobacco Related Links

Tobacco Free U
STAND Sacramento

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Jesse Snow Memorial Fund Grant

Jesse Snow Memorial Fund Grant


Jesse Snow 1981-2001

Jesse Snow, a 20-year-old Sac State student, was fatally injured in October 2001, following an evening of drinking at a local restaurant. At the request of parents, Patricia Metzger-Snow and Stephen Snow, the restaurant has made a $50,000 donation available to Sac State.
 

SPRING 2015

Applications will be accepted February 2, 2015 through February 27, 2015

 

 Funding Priorities

The Snow Family has established three priorities for use of these funds by the campus.  All proposals should meet one or more of the following funding priorities.

  1. Alcohol education and prevention programs.
  2. On-campus, non-alcoholic social events that target a general Sac State student audience.
  3. Development of the ASI Safe Rides program (approximately 20% of the fund).

Special consideration shall be given to projects/activities that encourage healthy lifestyle choices without alcohol; are innovative; have demonstrable need; benefit and appeal to the greatest number of Sac State students; and include collaboration with other funding sources.

General Instructions

  1. Review the Jesse Snow Memorial Fund Criteria and Process.
  2. Complete the Jesse Snow Memorial Fund Proposal and Budget Form.
  3. Include a written quote from each vendor for each specific line item you are requesting.
  4. Submit one copy of a typed, completed application and budget worksheet by 4:30 pm on the deadline date to Room 1011 of the Health & Wellness Promotion Department at The WELL or by emailing the application to Sabrina Word at Sabrina.word@csus.edu

Single request for funding of projects/activities/events normally will not exceed $2,500 for any given semester.

Please contact Sabrina Word at (916) 278-6026 or sabrina.word@csus.edu for information about the next funding cycle.

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Bike Across America for Mental Health

Bike Across America for Mental Health


On April 2nd, 2015

The WELL Terrace Suite

Hear his story. Ride to give hope.

Active Minds Mental Health Awareness Speaker David Romano will embark on a 5 week journey to Bike Across America for Mental Health, a feat that no one else has completed in the name of mental health. Too many people struggle in silence. Too many people lose their lives to suicide.  Dave will begin his journey in San Francisco and finish in Washington D.C., in total biking over 3200 miles. Along the ride he’ll stop to give presentations and have dialogues at campuses and in wider communities, engaging as many people as possible, and changing the conversation surrounding mental health. In doing so together we can destroy the stigma that causes so much pain.

 

About David Romano

Dave Romano lives with depression and experienced the dark lows of self-injury and a suicide attempt during high school. Since getting the support and help he needed, Dave has been committed to letting others, especially men, know that it isn’t a weakness to ask for help. Dave empowers audiences to embrace who they are and support each other in eliminating the stigma attached to mental illness.

 

For more information contact Jennifer Burton at (916) 278-2749 or email jennifer.burton@csus.edu.            

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

General Alcohol Information

General Alcohol Information


Disclaimer:

Information on this website is based on a harm-reduction model. Sac State does not endorse or approve of underage drinking. Students have choices when it comes to alcohol consumption. It is our intention to provide you with the information you need to make healthier choices. If you choose to drink, this website is designed to offer you the knowledge and skills needed to do so with less risk and harm. (If you choose not to drink, this website will give you the knowledge you may need to help others.)

Sac State Statistics

  • Most Sac State students (77%) never drink and drive
  • Most Sac State students (75%) have 0-3 drinks per week
  • Most Sac State students (79%) drink once a week or less

source: 2006 Sacramento State Core Survey

National Statistics

Alcohol kills more young people than cocaine, heroin, and every other illegal drug combined. Eighteen million Americans are addicted to alcohol or have alcohol abuse issues. Alcohol is considered the No. 1 public health issue of today’s youth.

  • 1,700  college students between the ages of 18 -24 die each year from alcohol misuse.
  • 97,000  college students reported cases of sexual abuse because of alcohol use.
  • 696,000  reported cases of students being assaulted by someone who had been drinking.
  • 599,000  college students blamed unintentional injuries on alcohol use.

Source: www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov  (2007)

Under 21?

  • The brain does not finish developing until a person is in their mid 20’s, and one of the last regions (of the brain) to mature is intimately involved with the ability to plan and make complex judgments. (www.madd.org/stats)
  • If you’re under 21 years old refusal to submit to a blood alcohol test is an admission of guilt to driving under the influence of alcohol.(www.dmv.ca.gov)

If you are under 21 years of age, the safest choice is choosing not to drink. It is the only legal alternative if you’re under 21.

Here are some of the consequences you may face if you are caught engaging in underage drinking, or furnishing alcohol to a minor:

Action Possible Consequence
A person who sells, gives, or furnishes an alcoholic beverage to a minor. Can receive: A $1000 fine and/or 24 hours of community service.
A minor who purchases or consumes an alcoholic beverage. Can receive: a minimum $250 fine and/or 24 to 32 hours of community service.
A minor who attempts to purchase an alcoholic beverage Can receive: A maximum $100 fine. Second offense, maximum $250 fine.
A minor who possesses an alcoholic beverage in a public place or a place open to the public. Can receive: A maximum $1000 fine and/or 6 months in jail.
A minor who possesses false identification (“false” means altered, counterfeited or belonging to someone else). Can receive: A minimum $250 fine and/or 24 to 32 hours of community service.
A person who sells alcoholic beverages without a license (ex. having a keg party and charging admission at the door). Can receive: A maximum $1000 fine and/or 6 months in county jail.
A person between the ages of 13 and 21 who is convicted of certain alcohol or drug related crimes, including (but not limited to) an attempt to purchase alcoholic beverages, possession of false identification, driving under the influence or riding a bicycle under the influence. Can receive: A one-year suspension of the person’s driving privilege or a one-year delay in receiving a driver’s license if the person does not drive yet.

How Does Alcohol Work?

  • Alcohol is a depressant drug that slows down the central nervous system.
  • Alcohol requires no digestion so it is absorbed directly into the blood stream.
  • Alcohol can be delivered to the brain within minutes of consumption.
  • Alcohol effects the brain centers progressively.
  • First: it affects the centers that control judgment, reason, and caution.
  • Second: it affects the centers that control motor skills and vital functions.
  • Alcohol is removed from the body through a process called oxidation.
  • If a person drinks faster than the liver can remove the alcohol, it builds up, making the sedative effects of the alcohol increasingly pronounced.

BAC (Blood Alcohol Content)

BAC is given as a percentage which indicates how much alcohol is in the blood stream. For example, a person with a BAC of .08% has 8 parts alcohol to 10,000 parts blood. There are many factors that can affect a persons BAC (also known as BAL or Blood Alcohol Level), including:

  • How much alcohol has been consumed
  • How fast the alcohol was consumed
  • Gender
  • Weight
  • How much food is in the stomach
  • Hormones (menstrual cycle and hormonal contraception influence BAC in women)

In California a BAC of .08% is considered impaired. If you are under 21, a BAC of anything but 0.00 is illegal when driving.

Blacking out vs. Passing out

What is the difference between blacking out and passing out? Are they the same thing? No.

  • A “black out” is an amnesia-like period while drinking that a person does not remember although they were not passed out or sleeping.
  • “Passing out” is the loss of consciousness. This constitutes a medical emergency, see Alcohol Poisoning.

Top 10 Consequences of Drinking:

  • Had a hangover
  • Got nauseated or vomited
  • Driven a car while under the influence
  • Done something I later regretted
  • Been criticized by someone I know
  • Got into an argument or fight
  • Had a memory loss
  • Missed a class
  • Performed poorly on a test or important project
  • Been hurt or injured

Source: Sacramento State 2006 Core Alcohol and Drug Survey

Tolerance

Tolerance is the degree to which a person has adapted to a given BAC. A person with a high tolerance for alcohol requires more of it in order to feel its intoxicating effects. A high tolerance can be hazardous because a person’s BAC is the same regardless of their tolerance. High tolerance can indicate a potential alcohol problem.

Sobering Up

There are many myths about how to sober up more quickly or how to avoid a hangover (ie: taking a shower, drinking coffee, exercising, etc.) but do any of them really work?
The answer is no.

Alcohol leaves the body through metabolism by the liver at a rate of 0.15% per hour (approximately one standard drink per hour). This means that a person would need to drink less than one drink per hour in order to avoid accumulation of a BAC.

When to Stop - The Point of Diminishing Returns

At what point does drinking become a negative instead of a positive experience? The answer is the point of diminishing returns! This is the point at which one more drink will not make you feel better, but will result in more impairment and increase the risk of an alcohol-related incident. The point of diminishing returns begins at a BAC of approximately .05%.

Drinking Smart

If you drink, drink smart. Here are some guidelines:

  • Set a drinking limit of .05 BAC (the point of diminishing returns), before you start drinking.
  • Check a BAC chart to estimate your BAC based on the number of drinks you have consumed and your gender.
  • Keep track of how much you drink.
  • Drink slowly, don’t gulp.
  • Eat before and while you are drinking. Foods high in fat and protein are best.
  • Alternate alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks.
  • Choose to spend less time with friends who tend to drink excessively and choose to spend time with friends who don’t (or seldomly) drink.
  • Don’t attend social events where heavy drinking will occur.
  • Try drinking less than you usually do or refusing drinks that are offered to you.
  • Practice 3 ways to be more comfortable in social situations without using alcohol.
  • Identify healthy ways to reduce stress (ex: exercise or meditation).
  • Discuss your risk reduction goals with a friend or significant other.
  • Don’t play drinking games as they tend to encourage high risk drinking.
  • Know your family history.
     

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Alcohol Information

Alcohol Information



 

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Contact Us

Contact Us


Insert Content here

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

SHAC

SHAC


What is SHAC?

SHAC is a student-based organization that advises the Senior Vice President of Planning, Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (PEMSA) and the Executive Director of Student Health & Counseling Services on issues from a student’s perspective; covering such topics as accessibility, hours of operation, scope of services, student fees, quality of care and satisfaction.

Mission Statement:

SHAC’s mission is to ensure health care needs and concerns of Sacramento State students are appropriately addressed.

Officers:

  • President: Manmeet K.  Singh
  • Vice President of Internal Affairs: Melissa Bardo
  • Vice President of Records: Carly Kubochi
  • Vice President of Finances: Miriam Alexander
  • Vice President of Campaign Affairs: Shalni Kumar
  • Vice President of Marketing: Nicole Potter
  • Advisor: Regina Kentner

How can you get involved?

SHAC welcomes students of all majors to join. SHAC consists of Officers, Student Representatives and Active Members. To find out more information on how to get involved with SHAC attend a meeting or contact us at shac@csus.edu.

Fall 2014 Meetings: 

  • September 9: 4:30-5:30 pm-Shoreline Room, 2nd floor, the WELL
  • September 23: 4:30-5:30 pm-Shoreline Room, 2nd floor, the WELL
  • October 7: 4:30-5:30 pm-Shoreline Room, 2nd floor, the WELL
  • October 21: 4:30-5:30 pm-Shoreline Room, 2nd floor, the WELL
  • November 4: 4:30-5:30 pm-Shoreline Room, 2nd floor, the WELL
  • November 18: 4:30-5:30 pm-Shoreline Room, 2nd floor, the WELL
  • December 2: 4:30-5:30 pm-Shoreline Room, 2nd floor, the WELL

Wellness Ambassador Training:

Is a thee day training offered in the Fall semester that provides students with the information and skills they need to be effective Wellness Ambassadors on the Sacramento State Campus. The training familiarizes students with important topics including: The Seven Dimensions of Wellness, Patients Rights and Responsibilities and Event Planning. During training students will also have the opportunity to become familiar with the Student Health and Counseling Services facility and Staff. For further inquiries about Wellness Ambassador Training contact us at shac@csus.edu.

Contact SHAC:

Email: shac@csus.edu
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/shac.csus
Orgsync: https://orgsync.com/8873/chapter
Phone: 916-278-5422

Peer Health Education Internships

Peer Health Education Internships


Click Here to Apply

Applications Due April 24th by 5pm.


Who We Are

The mission of SHCS is to enhance students’ educational experience by addressing health-related barriers to learning, enabling students to make informed health decisions, and promoting the seven dimensions of wellness – Intellectual, Emotional, Environmental, Physical, Career/ Financial, Spiritual, and Socio-Cultural. 

The Health & Wellness Promotion Department has been an integral part of the Student Health Center since 1978. Our goals in Health & Wellness Promotion are:

  • To promote and build a healthy campus environment that supports comprehensive wellness of all community members.
  • To enhance student health status and respond to student health needs through the use of educational programs, workshops, and materials.
  • To expand the role of SHCS to be an educational learning site as well as a health care facility.
  • To offer students an opportunity to function as Peer Health Educators (PHEs) under the supervision of professional Health Education staff.

Active Minds (Mental Health Program)

Active Minds Peer Health Educators are responsible for educating Sacramento State students and the campus community about mental health and emotional wellness issues (such as depression, anxiety, stress management, eating disorders, body image and suicide prevention) and reducing stigma associated with mental health issues and treatment. This internship will focus primarily on providing outreach, awareness campaigns, interactive workshops and presentations to the Sacramento State campus community. 

Alcohol, Tobacco, Other Drugs (ATOD)

The ATOD program educates Sac State students about alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs, with the mission to reduce the harm associated with high risk drinking and drug use among the student population.  

Nutrition Program

The Nutrition Program’s primary objective is to enhance students’ wellness through nutritional services. Our program trains students wanting hands-on nutrition education experience.  As part of the internship, students will complete basic nutrition and wellness coursework and are trained to participate in a variety of nutrition education outreach programs including: cooking demonstrations, presentations, workshops, health fairs, and health awareness weeks.  Additionally, students will provide one-on-one education through 3 Day Diet Analysis and will offer ongoing goal setting sessions for students participating in the WIN nutrition management program.

Healthy Relationships

The Healthy Relationships program provides information to Sac State students about reproductive health, safer sex practices, communication, relationships, decision making, and sexually transmitted infections. This program also focuses on empowering students to address violence issues such as sexual assault, intimate partner violence and stalking.

 

For a description: Student_Internship_Description
 Click Here to Apply 
Applications Due April 24th by 5pm.

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Get Involved

Get Involved


Student Health Advisory Committee (SHAC)

SHAC is a student-based organization that advices the Senior Vice President of Planning, Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (PEMSA) and the Executive Director of Student Health & Counseling Services on issues from a student’s perspective; covering such topics as accessibility, hours of operation, scope of services, student fees, quality of care and satisfaction..

SHAC members have the opportunity to gain and enhance leadership skills and may receive a letter of recommendation when they have finished their time of service. SHAC also does events that help educate students about health and is interested in getting feedback from students about the Health Center and its services.

SHAC welcomes students from all majors – anyone is welcome to join! If you are interested, you can contact the SHAC at shac@csus.edu or the Health & Wellness Promotion Department at 278-5422.

Student Internships

The Health & Wellness Promotion Department has been an integral part of Student Health Services since 1978. All Health Education programs provide direct client services, health information, literature, referral, outreach and special events. Our goal in Health Education is:

  •  To enhance student health status and respond to student health needs through the use of educational programs, strategies and materials.
  •  To expand the role of the SHC to be an educational learning site as well as a health care facility.
  •  To offer students an opportunity to function as peer health educators under the supervision of professional Health Education staff.

The Health & Wellness Promotion Department offers student internships in the following content areas:

  1. Active Minds
  2. Alcohol and Violence
  3. Nutrition
  4. Sexuality & Reproductive Health

Internships are designed as an academic related learning activity and provide an opportunity to:

  • Expand one's health knowledge
  • Earn academic units
  • Explore working in the health field
  • Be part of a health education team
  • Enhance communication, teaching, group process skills
  • Help fellow students/peers
  • Develop and provide educational presentations
  • Participate in outreach activities which would develop and/or enhance skills in publicity, public relations, and in planning and implementing educational programs or special events.
  • Have fun

Requirements

  • Interest in health education and college health issues
  • Two-semester commitment
  • Completion of summer assignment
  • Attendance at weekly staff inservice meetings
  • Attendance at two-day training program
  • Able to perform student intern job duties and be accountable by adhering to Health Center policies and Program Supervisor.
  • This program may be taken for 1-3 units per semester. Each unit equals approximately 3 hours per week. Units may be earned through Interdisciplinary (ID) 195A or through an academic department arranged by you.

If I Am Interested, What do I do now?

  • Check back on this website in April to download our applications. 

Who do I call if I have questions or need more information

Feel free to contact any of the Health Education Department Program Managers at 278-5422.

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Campus Calendar

Campus Calendar


Insert Content here

Events

Events


For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Presentations

Presentations


Health & Wellness Promotion Outreach Presentations

Student Health & Counseling, Health & Wellness Promotion Department offers a wide variety of educational presentations from the Alcohol & Violence, Active Minds, Nutrition, and Sexuality & Reproductive Health Programs.  Presentations include:

Active Minds 
  • College Mental Health:  This presentation uses "clickers in the classroom" technology to teach students about mental health among college students including anxiety, depression and stress. We bring the clickers to your class!  Peer-led discussion also reviews how to help a friend and campus resources. 
  • Stress Management:  Learn simple techniques to manage stress that college students face including balancing family obligations, academic work and friends in a healthy manner.  Participants will also determine their own personal "Stress Style."
Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
  • Alcohol Jeopardy - Presentation includes information about alcohol and drugs in a “game show” environment.
Nutrition
  • Nutrition Jeopardy - Interactive and Fun!  You will love this game-show format!  Curious about nutrition and how it affects our health and the environment we live in? Then this is the presentation for your group. Best for groups of 50 students or less.
  • Healthy Eating While on College - An interactive presentation to help navigate eating at restaurants and fast food, reading food labels, and healthy meal planning for students with a busy schedule and tight budget.
  • Food & Mood – Presentation on how your mood affects your food choices and vice versa.  Gives strategies on healthy eating and emotional wellness.
  • Cooking Demonstrations – For groups of 20 or less. Not sure what to cook? Don’t have time? Have limited cooking skills? Learn how to prepare quick and tasty, budget-friendly recipes.  Participants get to sample each recipe and receive copies of the recipes to take home to practice on their own.
Healthy Relationships
  • Sexual Health Jeopardy - Presentation focuses on birth control information, sexually transmitted disease awareness, and healthy sexuality.
  • Safer Sex - Presentation on sexually transmitted infections and how to prevent them.  Also included is how to talk to your partner about sexual histories and sexually transmitted infection issues.
  • Healthy Relationships - Presentation discusses healthy dating relationships and also educates about intimate partner violence.
  • Be An Empowered Bystander! - Presentation discusses sexual assault and dating violence, as well as establishing bystander intervention strategies to keep our fellow students safe.
*If you have a specific educational need we can create or tailor a presentation for your class or group.
Please complete this form to request a presentation.
We will get back to you within five(5) business days. For questions about a presentation please email Reva Wittenberg at reva.wittenberg@csus.edu.
Costs & Eligibility

Costs & Eligibility


All currently enrolled students at Sac State who pay student health fees as part of their tuition fees, are eligible to be seen by Student Health Services. Health Services Fees provides for basic medical services as defined by EO943 and basic mental health services as defined by EO1053.  Augmented services may be offered which include those services that are considered elective or specialized in nature and NOT included as basic health services.  These services vary and are offered on a fee for service basis. Any outside health services received by students are their financial responsibility.

Associated Students Inc. offers health insurance to students – for more information visit http://www.csuhealthlink.com

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Cooking Demos

Cooking Demos


We offer free cooking demonstrations for students during Fall and Spring semesters.  View our upcoming schedule here: https://shcssacstate.org/wellness-promotion/events

All cooking demonstrations take place in The Cove on the first floor of The Well and include recipe demonstration and samples.  Class size is limited – stop by Health and Wellness Promotion (Room 1011) or call 916-278-5422 to reserve a space! 

Schedule an Appointment

Schedule an Appointment


Nutrition Services

Individual Nutrition Counseling:

How to Make an Appointment:

  • Call Health and Wellness Promotion at 916-278-5422.
  • In-person by visiting Health and Wellness Promotion on the first floor of The Well (Room 1011).
  • Ask your Student Health and Counseling Services provider for a referral.

Diet Analysis

Diet analysis forms can be picked up in Health and Wellness Promotion on the first floor of The Well (Room 1011).  Completed forms should be returned to Health and Wellness Promotion and during that time, an appointment will be made to review results.

Cooking Demos

All cooking demonstrations take place in The Cove on the first floor of The Well and include recipe demonstration and samples.  Class size is limited – stop by Health and Wellness Promotion or call 916-278-5422 to reserve a space.

WIN Program (Healthy Eating Program)

Recruitment begins in December.  Call 916-278-5422 or stop by Health and Wellness Promotion inside The Well.

Alcohol, Drug and Tobacco Appointments

For an individual appointment with our Alcohol, Drug and Tobacco Health Educator please contact:
Amelia Stults at 916-278-6026 or email her at astults@csus.edu.

Victim Advocate Appointments

For an appointment with our Violence and Sexual Assault Victim Advocate, please contact:
Jessica Heskin at 916-278-3799 or email her at heskin@csus.edu

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Appointments

Appointments


Nutrition Services

Individual Nutrition Counseling

How to Make an Appointment

·  Call Health and Wellness Promotion at 916-278-5422.

·  In-person by visiting Health and Wellness Promotion on the first floor of The Well (Room 1011).

·  Ask your Student Health and Counseling Services provider for a referral.

Contact Information:

·  Shauna Schultz, RD - 916-278-6038 - schultzs@csus.edu

·  Health and Wellness Promotion - 916-278-5422

Diet Analysis

Diet analysis forms can be picked up in Health and Wellness Promotion on the first floor of The Well (Room 1011).  Completed forms should be returned to Health and Wellness Promotion and during that time, an appointment will be made to review results. 

Contact Information:

·  Health and Wellness Promotion, first floor of The Well (Room 1011), 916-278-5422.

Cooking Demonstrations

All cooking demonstrations take place in The Cove on the first floor of The Well and include recipe demonstration and samples.  Class size is limited – stop by Health and Wellness Promotion (Room 1011) or call 916-278-5422 to reserve a space! 

SUCCEED Program

·  Recruitment begins in December.  If interested, please leave your name and contact information with us.  We will contact you to discuss program details and eligibility. 

·  Or, call 916-278-5422 or stop by Health and Wellness Promotion inside The Well.

 

Alcohol, Tobacco, or Other Drug Services

To make an appointment for an individual session with our Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug educator, please call Amelia Stults at (916) 278-6026 or email her at astults@csus.edu

Violence and Sexual Assault Support Services

To make an appointment with our victim advocate, please call Jessica Heskin at (916) 278-3799 or email her at heskin@csus.edu.

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Violence & Sexual Assault Support Services

Violence & Sexual Assault Support Services


The Sacramento State Violence and Sexual Assault Services Program, a component of Student Health and Counseling Services, is dedicated to reducing the incidence of sexual assault, domestic/intimate partner violence and stalking in the campus community. We work to increase campus safety, to broaden public awareness about the nature of sexual assault, domestic/intimate partner violence and stalking, its impact on men and women, and to mitigate the trauma of the victim/survivor. Our philosophy is that through education we can greatly reduce these forms of violence.

All intervention services are free and available to any Sac State student.  Services are available to any person who needs them regardless of gender, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, disability or religion.  Confidentiality is always respected. 

We provide a wide variety of programs and services designed to reduce trauma and to inform the University community about the resources available for dealing with sexual assault, domestic/intimate partner violence, stalking and their aftermath. Our educational programs, tailored to meet the needs of individual audiences, include films, discussion groups, lectures, role-plays, and communication exercises. We provide educational programs to many campus and community groups, including residence halls, sororities, fraternities, staff, athletic teams, student clubs and academic courses. 

Our program recognizes the impact that sexual assault, domestic/intimate partner violence and stalking have on the campus environment. We work to prevent and respond to incidents by collaborating with community services and other campus departments including WEAVE, My Sister’s House, the Sac State Women's Resource Center, the Sac State Pride Center, Student Housing, Student Judicial Affairs, Sac State Police Department, Employment Equity and Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS).

For more information or to speak with the Victim Advocate, call (916) 278-3799.

To file a complaint concerning harassment, sexual assault/dating violence, or stalking please visit the Office of Human Resources Equal Opportunity Page.

Services

Reviewing your options
Many times if someone is a victim of a crime, they are confused about their options for reporting the crime, as well as what the pros and cons of reporting may be. Our advocate can discuss these options with you and assist you in making a decision that is best for you.

Assist in reporting the crime
If you want to report the crime to law enforcement, whether on campus or off campus, the advocate can accompany you during that process.

Be respectful of the survivor’s decisions.
Often a survivor will not want to report the assault to the police. While you may not always agree with these types of decisions, respecting and supporting the survivor is very empowering. Supporting a survivor in this way enables him/her to feel in control of his/her life, a feeling that was taken away during the assault.

Assist in reporting to Student Affairs if the perpetrator is a student
You have the right to feel safe on campus, and harming another student is strictly against University policy. There are procedures that we can assist with though the Office of Student Conduct to ensure your safety.

Academic intervention
If you need academic intervention, we may be able to facilitate that so that you will experience minimal loss in academic standing.

Assist in obtaining counseling
After an assault, counseling is often a good idea. Our advocate can refer you for services and even accompany you to your first session if you would like.

Assist in obtaining legal help
We can help you obtain restraining orders, file Victim’s Compensation forms, and accompany you to detective interviews, district attorney interviews, and even court proceedings.

Assist in obtaining medical care
Even if you do not report the crime to law enforcement, you will need medical care. We can assist in obtaining that medical care for your health and well-being.

Sexual Assault

What is sexual assault?
Sexual assault is any sexual act against a person’s will and/or without their complete knowledge and consent.  It is important to recognize that sexual assault is NEVER THE VICTIM’S FAULT! If you or a friend is a victim of sexual assault, it is important that you get help.

Our University has several policies regarding harassment and sexual assault:

Implementation of Title IX, VAWA/Campus SaVE Act, and Related Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harrassment and Sexual Violence Legislation — Executive Order 1095.

Student Conduct Procedures — Executive Order 1098

Systemwide Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation Against Students and Systemwide Procedure for Handling Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation Complaints by Students — Executive Order 1097

  • Your immediate safety is first. Try to go to a safe place.
  • Reach out for support. You deserve it.
  • Call the campus victim advocate (916) 278-3799 or WEAVE at (916) 920-2952
  • Call someone you trust, like a friend or a member of your family.
  • Get medical attention as soon as possible. Your local rape crisis center can assist you with finding options. Medical care is important, in case you are injured and to protect against sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy.
  • Reporting to the police is your choice. If you decide not to go to the police right away, write down everything you remember about what happened and save it in case you change your mind.
  • You can report the incident to the campus Title IX office located in the Office of Education Equity regardless of whether you make a police report or not.  To report an incidence of domestic/dating violence, sexual assault/harassment, or stalking please visit HR Equal Opportunity Page.

Important Ways Family and Friends Can Help

  • Be clear that the rape or assault was not the survivor’s fault.
  • No one ever asks to be raped or assaulted. Raping someone is a conscious decision made by the perpetrator. Even if the survivor exercises bad judgment, he/she did not deserve to be raped; no one does.
  • Believe the survivor.
  • Feeling that he/she is believed by family and friends is essential for a rape survivor’s recovery. He/she has to overcome many obstacles to be able to speak out about what has happened. Allow the survivor to know you are open to hearing about his/her feelings and experiences. Although it may be painful for you to hear about what happened, letting the survivor know you are willing to enter those difficult places with her is important.
  • Do not question or judge what the survivor had to do to survive.
  • During a rape/sexual assault, victims are forced to make instant life threatening decisions. These decisions should not be criticized later. Survivors may not always scream or fight back. Their survival is evidence that they handled the assault the best way they could. Expressing to the survivor that you are thankful that he/she is alive enables his/her to feel more secure about her judgments.
  • Be respectful of the survivor’s decisions.
  • Often a survivor will not want to report the assault to the police. While you may not always agree with these types of decisions, respecting and supporting the survivor is very empowering. Supporting a survivor in this way enables him/her to feel in control of his/her life, a feeling that was taken away during the assault.
  • Validate and protect the survivor’s feelings: anger, pain, and fear.
  • These are natural responses to traumatic experiences. The survivor needs to express them, feel them, and be heard. Protecting the survivor’s confidentiality or anonymity is an important step in gaining his/her trust.
  • Express your compassion.
  • If you are feeling outrage, compassion, or pain, share these emotions with the survivor. There is nothing more comforting than genuine human response. Be cautious, however, that your responses are not too overwhelming for the survivor. Often family and friends of survivors feel compelled to “go after” the perpetrator. These feelings are very real and very understandable. However, they can be channeled in more non-violent ways.
  • Encourage the survivor to get support.
  • In addition to offering your own caring, encourage him/her to reach out to others. You can help find someone with whom she can talk. (Rape crisis centers have sexual assault/rape counselors.) Similarly, you may have many feelings about the rape/assault. Consider getting support for yourself, too. You will need to take care of yourself in order to be supportive of the survivor.
  • Get help if the survivor is suicidal.
  • Most survivors are not suicidal, but sometimes the emotional pain of the assault/rape is so devastating that they may want to kill themselves. If you are close to a survivor who is suicidal, get immediate help for him/her.
  • Resist seeing the survivor as a victim.
  • Continue to see the person as a strong, courageous individual who is reclaiming his/her own life.
  • Accept that there may be changes in your relationship with the survivor.
  • The person you love is changing, and you may need to change in response. Patience on your part is crucial to his/her healing process. Healing is a slow process that cannot be hurried.
  • Educate yourself about sexual assault/rape and the healing process.
  • If you have a basic idea of what the survivor has experienced, it will help you be supportive. Talking with other survivors, supporters of survivors, and/or utilizing services designed to help survivors will help you gain knowledge.
  • Seek counseling for yourself. You are also a victim in some ways. The ripple effect of sexual assault extends to family members, friends, and even coworkers. Contact our sexual assault advocate for referrals regarding counseling.

Intimate Partner Violence

What is intimate partner violence?

Intimate partner violence, otherwise known as domestic violence, is a crime in California. It can take many forms including physical, verbal, and sexual abuse. Intimate partner violence affects at least one out of every four American families.  Women ages 16 - 24 experience the highest per capita rates of intimate partner violence

You may be a victim of intimate partner violence, if you ...

  1. Are frightened by your partner’s temper
  2. Apologize to other people for your partner’s behavior
  3. Have been hit, kicked or shoved by your partner
  4. Go along with your partner’s wishes because you are afraid they will get mad
  5. Don’t see friends or relatives because your partner told you not to
  6. Think it is your fault when your partner treats you badly or hurts you
  7. Have excessive calls or texts from your partner wanting to know your whereabouts at all times
  8. Alter the way you act, dress, or socialize because of your partner’s excessive jealousy
  9. Are unable to use birth control because your partner won’t let you

There is help available!

If you are a member of Sac State, you can contact our victim’s advocate for information, referrals and support. Confidentiality is respected. You can also contact these community organizations:

What to do if a friend is in an intimate partner violent relationship?

Many of us know, or think we might know, a person who is in an abusive relationship. But we can always come up with reasons to ignore our discomfort and hope the problem will solve itself. Here are some common reasons why people don’t break the silence on intimate partner violence:

  • “I might get hurt…or make this worse for the victim.”
  • You do not need to physically intervene. And the only thing that can make this worse for the victim is for their torment to be ignored by those of us in a position to support them.
  • “If she/he wants to stay in such a lousy situation, that’s his/her problem.”
  • Victims are trapped in intimate partner violence by a number of factors: deep fear, lack of financial support, love, loyalty, cultural and family values, and the depression and hopelessness that constant abuse can cause. Also, victims know that abuse doesn’t stop just because they leave. In fact, the danger increases for many victims when they do leave. Imagining that a person is free to leave any time absolves us, but does not help them. Nobody can make the personal and painful decisions for them, but you can be there to support them.
  • “Poking my nose in will cost me their friendship…and they don’t seem to want to talk about it.”
  • Intimate partner violence could cost your friend their life. Talking about their situation isn’t easy for either of you. They may fee shame and guilt, so you need to be tactful, open, and non-judgmental. They may not respond the first time. They has to decide what’s safe and can’t be rushed in to action. If they hear your open-ended offer to put them in contact with an intimate partner violence hotline when they choose, they’ll feel safe coming back to you.

Here is an example of what to say.

It doesn’t sound very dramatic, but it can make a dramatic difference: “I’m concerned about you. Are you okay? Do you want to talk to me about it? ... It’s not your fault. You didn’t deserve it ... I understand ... I’m not going to share this with anyone else. I’m not going to tell you what to do. What you do is fine with me. You know, there’s a number to call to find out more about this. Do you want to call them now? Shall I give you the number? ... That’s okay. Just know that I have the number, if you ever want it. I do care.

Are there things NOT to say?

It doesn’t help to start planning a rescue or escape. Ask, rather than tell them what YOU think is going on. And don’t start criticizing their partner, however much you may feel they deserve it. (The best way to show you are on their side is by staying out of the business of the relationship itself. If they were able to confront their abuser and leave, they would already have done it.) The idea is to gently break through the isolation they are living in and offer a bridge they can use when they choose to.

Stalking

Stalking is a series of acts by another person that harasses you (for example repeated phone calls or repeated incidents of following you) and makes you fear for your safety. In California, it is a crime. Cyber stalking is a relatively newer form of harassment. This includes excessive emails or other electronic communications conveying threats.

  1. Approximately 30% of college women report being victims of stalking
  2. 81% of women who are stalked by a current or former boyfriend or husband were also physically assaulted by that partner
  3. The average stalking case lasts 1.8 years

It is very important that you DO NOT make arrangements to meet the stalker!

Do not try to “talk sense” into them. Save all evidence (i.e. emails, voice messages, texts, unused gifts) and present it to the police department. If you think you are a victim of stalking, please contact our office to speak with our victim’s advocate. We can assist you with police reports and restraining orders if necessary, as well as help you obtain psychological counseling services.

Resources

Sac State Victim Advocate (916) 278-3799
University Police (916) 278-6851
Housing and Residential Life (916) 278-6655
Student Health & Counseling Services (916) 278-6461
Office of Student Conduct (916) 278-6060
Office of Equal Opportunity (916) 278-5770
WEAVE’S 24 Hour Crisis Line (916) 920-2952
My Sister’s House 24 Hour Crisis Line (916) 428-3271
Empower Yolo (530) 662-1133

 

Title IX

 

Campus Title IX Program

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Sexuality & Reproductive Services

Sexuality & Reproductive Services


The Sexuality & Reproductive Health Program provides information to Sacramento State students about reproductive health, specifically birth control, safer sex practices, communication, relationships, decision making, and sexually transmitted infections.  Additionally, we assist with campus outreach activities and health promotion efforts.

FREE presentations offered for your class, department or student organization including:

  • Sexual Health Jeopardy and Safer Sex.

For more information stop by Health and Wellness Promotion in The Well (Room 1011) or call (916) 278-5422.

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Nutrition Services

Nutrition Services


New! The COVE Cookbook

The COVE Cookbook

Nutrition services offered at Student Health and Counseling Services include individual counseling and group classes.  Among the services provided are:

  • Individual Nutrition Counseling
  • Diet Analysis
  • WIN (Healthy Eating Program) 
  • Cooking Demonstrations
  • Interactive Educational Presentations
  • Information and Resources on Healthy Eating
  • Individual Nutrition Counseling

    Nutrition consultations include nutritional assessment, counseling, education and follow up (if needed) with a registered dietitian.  Nutrition counseling is available for a variety of nutrition related health issues:

    • Eating Disorders
    • Diabetes
    • Digestive Problems
    • Food Allergies or Intolerance's
    • Healthy Eating and Meal Planning
    • High Blood Pressure
    • High Cholesterol/Triglycerides
    • Sports Nutrition
    • Vegetarian/Vegan Diets
    • Weight Management
    • Other Nutrition Concerns
    How to Make an Appointment
    • Call Health and Wellness Promotion at 916-278-5422.
    • In-person by visiting Health and Wellness Promotion on the first floor of The Well (Room 1011).
    • Ask your Student Health and Counseling Services provider for a referral.
    Contact Information
    • Health and Wellness Promotion - 916-278-5422
  • Diet Analysis

    Diet analysis appointments are available for students who are interested in evaluating or improving their diets.  A diet analysis will help you:

    • Assess, monitor and modify your diet as needed
    • Ensure your nutritional needs are being met
    • Optimize your diet to enhance your personal health goals
    • Evaluate your meal planning

    All diet analysis appointments include a one-on-one meeting with a trained peer health educator.  They will help you navigate your diet analysis results and answer any general questions you might have.  You will also receive educational resources on nutrition and healthy eating and referrals to professional staff as needed.

    Diet analysis forms can be picked up in Health and Wellness Promotion on the first floor of The Well (Room 1011).  Completed forms should be returned to Health and Wellness Promotion and during that time, an appointment will be made to review results. 

    If you are a faculty member interested in using diet analysis as part of your class, please contact our Health and Wellness Promotion office at 916-278-5422.

  • WIN Program (Well Into Nutrition)

    WIN is a 4-week healthy lifestyle program offered every spring semester. Our professional staff and Peer Health Educators assist in making healthy changes to your life; giving you the skill set to succeed. 

    • Nutrition assessment with a registered dietitian and Nutrition Peer Health Educators
    • Cooking demonstrations
    • Weekly meetings  with trained peer health educators
    • Wellness booklet and packet filled with recipes, meal ideas and other tips and tools
    • Nutrition goal setting
    • Incentives for participation
    • Healthy eating on campus 

    How to sign up:

    • Recruitment begins in December.  If interested, please leave your name and contact information with us.  We will contact you to discuss program details and eligibility.
    • Or, call 916-278-5422 or stop by Health and Wellness Promotion inside The Well.
  • Cooking Demonstrations

    Join us and learn how to cook food that is healthy, delicious and easy to prepare.  Our classes are designed with the busy college student in mind and cover a wide variety of cooking styles.

    We offer free cooking demonstrations for students during Fall and Spring semesters.  View our upcoming schedule here: https://shcssacstate.org/wellness-promotion/events

    All cooking demonstrations take place in The Cove on the first floor of The Well and include recipe demonstration and samples.  Class size is limited – stop by Health and Wellness Promotion or call 916-278-5422 to reserve a space! 

    Cooking Demonstration Recipes
  • Interactive Educational Presentations

    Nutrition presentations are available upon request and include a wide variety of topics.  Click here to request a presentation.

    • Cooking Demonstrations
    • Food and Mood
    • Health Eating While in College
    • Nutrition Jeopardy
  • Information and Resources on Healthy Eating

    Stop by the Health and Wellness Promotion office on the first floor of The Well (room 1011) for questions about healthy eating and nutrition.  We have a variety of resources on hand to help you out!  For credible online information, check out the following sites. 

    Healthy Online Resources
    Phone Applications
    • Vegetarian Resource Group
    • All Recipes Dinner Spinner
    • My Fitness Pal
    • Lose It
    • Eating Well Healthy in a Hurry
    • Spark People Mobile & Spark Recipes Mobile
    • My Tracks
    • Map My Fitness
    • Restaurant Nutrition
    • My Food Nutrition Facts
    • Fitness Pro 

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Active Minds

Active Minds


Our Mission:

Active Minds at Sacramento State strives to educate the campus community about mental health and emotional wellness issues (such as depression, anxiety, stress management, eating disorders, body image and suicide prevention), all in an effort to reduce the stigma associated with mental health issues and treatment. Services are offered by Peer Health Educators with a focus on providing outreach, promoting awareness campaigns, interactive workshops, and presentations to the Sacramento State community under the direct supervision of the Sacramento State Student Health and Counseling Services staff.

Our Services:

FREE presentations for your class, department or student organization.

Including: Stress Management, College Mental Health, Sleep, Body Image, Food and Mood, and College Health Jeopardy.

Interactive Workshop: Working Out Your Stress (WOYS)

Feeling a bit stressed out?  This workshop is a FREE drop-in stress management workshop that is offered weekly throughout the semester. Come join Active Minds Peer Health Educators and learn about stress in a whole new way. Workshops are held in The Cove, located on the first floor of The WELL during Fall and Spring semesters. Check back for Fall 2014 dates to be posted soon!

 

Questions:

If you have any questions or would like to schedule a presentation please call Health and Wellness Promotion at 916-278-5422.

Advisors:

Jennifer Burton, MS, CHES, Health Educator, jennifer.burton@csus.edu

Katie Hodgson, ASW, Case Manager, hodgsonk@csus.edu

Check it out:
http://www.activeminds.org/
http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Alcohol, Tobacco & Other Drugs

Alcohol, Tobacco & Other Drugs


Our Mission

The Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Education Program works to reduce the harm associated with high risk drinking, tobacco and drug use through education, collaboration, student leadership development, and provision of resources to support and encourage healthy choices.

Alcohol Poisoning

Alcohol Poisoning is a MEDICAL EMERGENCY.  Over 1,700 college students die each year as a result of alcohol related causes, including alcohol poisoning.  Knowing the signs and symptoms of alcohol poisoning can help you identify a potentially dangerous situation.

Aware, Awake, Alive: Signs & Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning

If you suspect that someone has alcohol poisoning, even if you don’t see the classic signs and symptoms, seek immediate medical care. In an emergency, follow these suggestions:

Learn more here about the Aware, Awake, Alive Campaign:

What To Do

  • Call 911 immediately if a person is suffering from any of the above symptoms
  • Turn the person on his/her side.
  • Focus on your friend’s health, not on keeping them or you out of trouble
  • Never leave them alone

How to Deal with the Intoxicated Person

  • Demonstrate concern for the person’s welfare.
  • Speak in a clear & calm voice in order to reassure them.
  • Find out what the person was drinking, how much they drank and how long they have been drinking.
  • Ask about any other drugs or medicines they may have taken.
  • Explain what you intend to do.
  • Arrange for someone to stay with the person who is vomiting.
  • Call for help if the person becomes uncontrollable or you sense an impending medical emergency.
  • As needed, encourage the intoxicated person to lie down and sleep.  Make sure they’re lying on their side to avoid choking should they start to vomit.
  • Check every 30 minutes for response and breathing for the first 2 hours and every hour thereafter.

What NOT to Do

  • Leave the person alone or assume that they will “sleep it off”.
  • Give the person a shower.
  • Give the person food or anything to drink (especially stimulants such as tea or coffee) to sober them up.
  • Induce vomiting.
  • Keep the person awake.
  • Never let an intoxicated person drive a motor vehicle or bike.
  • Write on them.
  • Walk them around.

E-Chug

Click here for E-Chug Services

Services

  • Alcohol and Other Drug Individual Sessions
  • Tobacco Cessation Individual Sessions
  • Alcohol Education Classes
  • Drug Education Classes
  • Classroom Presentations
  • Internship Opportunities

Resources

  • Sacramento State Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Program, 916-278-6026
  • Sacramento State Police Department, 916-278-6581
  • Sacramento State Counseling & Psychological Services, 916-278-6461
  • Sacramento State Safe Rides, 916-278-TAXI
  • Northern California Alcoholics Anonymous, 530-225-8955
  • Northern California Narcotics Anonymous, 707-422-9234
  • California Smokers’ Helpline, 1-800-No-BUTTS

Jesse Snow Grant

Jesse Snow, a 20-year-old Sac State student, was fatally injured in October 2001, following an evening of drinking at a local restaurant. At the request of parents, Patricia Metzger-Snow and Stephen Snow, the restaurant has made a $50,000 donation available to Sac State.

The Jesse Snow Memorial Grant Fund will return soon.  For more information, please contact Sabrina Word at sabrina.word@csus.edu.

For medical or psychiatric emergencies, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest hospital.

Programs & Services

Programs & Services


Health and Wellness Promotion provides the following five programs:

For more information stop by Room 1011 in The Well or call (916) 278-5422.